Maurice Schweitzer

Maurice Schweitzer
  • Cecilia Yen Koo Professor
  • Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions
  • Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    3730 Walnut Street
    544 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: behavioral decision research, deception and trust, emotions, negotiations

Links: CV, Personal Website, @ME_Schweitzer, Friend&Foe, Decision Processes Group, OPEQ Exercise, Friend&Foe_Amazon, Maurice Schweitzer

Overview

Maurice Schweitzer is the Cecilia Yen Koo Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on emotions, ethical decision making, and the negotiation process. He has published in Management, Psychology, and Economics journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, the Journal of Applied Psychology, Management Science, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Science, and the American Economic Review.

Maurice teaches Negotiations and Advanced Negotiations in Wharton’s executive education, MBA, and undergraduate programs. He has won several teaching awards including Wharton’s Whitney Award for distinguished teaching and Wharton’s Hauck award for excellence in teaching. Maurice Schweitzer has won best paper awards at the Academy of Management and at the International Association for Conflict Management. He has served as the program chair for both the International Association for Conflict Management and the Society for Judgment and Decision Making conferences. He served as an associate editor for Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes and Negotiation and Conflict Management Research. He is currently an associate editor at Management Science.


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Research

Teaching

Maurice Schweitzer teaches both Negotiations and Advanced Negotiations, a course he designed and introduced at Wharton.

Current Courses

  • LGST292 - Advanced Negotiations

    This course is designed to teach negotiation principles and to enable students to develop their negotiation skills. This course assumes familiarity with the basic negotiation concepts covered in the prerequisite for this course: Negotiations. In this course, we extend the study and practice of negotiations and we develop a deeper understanding for how specific aspects of the negotiation process (e.g., emotions, deadlines, trust violations) impact outcomes. Through course lectures, readings, and case exercises, students will develop a rich framework for thinking about the negotiation process and acquire tools for guiding the negotiation process.

    LGST292401

  • LGST692 - Advanced Negotiations

    LGST692401

  • MGMT292 - Advanced Negotiation

    MGMT292401

  • MGMT692 - Advanced Negotiation

    MGMT692401

  • OIDD292 - Adv Topics Negotiation

    This course is designed to teach negotiation principles and to enable students to develop their negotiation skills. This course builds upon and assumes familiarity with the negotiation concepts covered in the prerequisite for this course: "Negotiations." In this course, we extend the study and practice of negotiations, and we develop a deeper understanding of how specific aspects of the negotiation process impact outcomes. Through course lectures, readings, and exercises, students will develop a rich framework for thinking about the negotiation process and acquire tools for guiding the negotiation process.

    OIDD292401

  • OIDD299 - Judg & Dec Making Res Im

    This class provides a high-level introduction to the field of judgment and decision making (JDM) and in-depth exposure to the process of doing research in this area. Throughout the semester you will gain hands-on experience with several different JDM research projects. You will be paired with a PhD student or faculty mentor who is working on a variety of different research studies. Each week you will be given assignments that are central to one or more of these studies, and you will be given detailed descriptions of the research projects you are contributing to and how your assignments relate to the successful completion of these projects. To complement your hands-on research experience, throughout the semester you will be assigned readings from the book Nudge by Thaler and Sunstein, which summarizes key recent ideas in the JDM literature. You will also meet as a group for an hour once every three weeks with the class's faculty supervisor and all of his or her PhD students to discuss the projects you are working on, to discuss the class readings, and to discuss your own research ideas stimulated by getting involved in various projects. Date and time to be mutually agreed upon by supervising faculty and students. the 1CU version of this course will involve approx. 10 hours of research immersion per week and a 10-page paper. The 0.5 CU version of this course will involve approx 5 hours of research immersion per week and a 5-page final paper. Please contact Maurice Schweitzer if you are interested in enrolling in the course: schweitzer@wharton.upenn.edu

    OIDD299001

  • OIDD692 - Adv Topics Negotiation

    OIDD692401

Past Courses

  • LGST206 - NEGOTIATION/CONFLICT RES

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

  • LGST292 - ADVANCED NEGOTIATIONS

    This course is designed to teach negotiation principles and to enable students to develop their negotiation skills. This course assumes familiarity with the basic negotiation concepts covered in the prerequisite for this course: Negotiations. In this course, we extend the study and practice of negotiations and we develop a deeper understanding for how specific aspects of the negotiation process (e.g., emotions, deadlines, trust violations) impact outcomes. Through course lectures, readings, and case exercises, students will develop a rich framework for thinking about the negotiation process and acquire tools for guiding the negotiation process.

  • LGST806 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • MGMT291 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course includes not only conflict resolution but techniques which help manage and even encourage the valuable aspects of conflict. The central issues of this course deal with understanding the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations in conflict management situations. The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiations as it is practiced ina variety of settings. The course is designed to be relevant to the broad specturm of problems that are faced by the manager and professional including management of multinationals, ethical issues, and alternative dispute resolutions. Cross listed w/ LGST 206 & OPIM 291.

  • MGMT292 - ADVANCED NEGOTIATION

  • MGMT691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation. This course develops managerial skills by combining lectures with practice, using exercises where students negotiate with each other. Over the course of the semester, students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with LGST 806/OPIM 691.

  • OIDD292 - ADV TOPICS NEGOTIATION

    This course is designed to teach negotiation principles and to enable students to develop their negotiation skills. This course builds upon and assumes familiarity with the negotiation concepts covered in the prerequisite for this course: "Negotiations." In this course, we extend the study and practice of negotiations, and we develop a deeper understanding of how specific aspects of the negotiation process impact outcomes. Through course lectures, readings, and exercises, students will develop a rich framework for thinking about the negotiation process and acquire tools for guiding the negotiation process.

  • OIDD299 - JUDG & DEC MAKING RES IM

    This class provides a high-level introduction to the field of judgment and decision making (JDM) and in-depth exposure to the process of doing research in this area. Throughout the semester you will gain hands-on experience with several different JDM research projects. You will be paired with a PhD student or faculty mentor who is working on a variety of different research studies. Each week you will be given assignments that are central to one or more of these studies, and you will be given detailed descriptions of the research projects you are contributing to and how your assignments relate to the successful completion of these projects. To complement your hands-on research experience, throughout the semester you will be assigned readings from the book Nudge by Thaler and Sunstein, which summarizes key recent ideas in the JDM literature. You will also meet as a group for an hour once every three weeks with the class's faculty supervisor and all of his or her PhD students to discuss the projects you are working on, to discuss the class readings, and to discuss your own research ideas stimulated by getting involved in various projects. Date and time to be mutually agreed upon by supervising faculty and students. the 1CU version of this course will involve approx. 10 hours of research immersion per week and a 10-page paper. The 0.5 CU version of this course will involve approx 5 hours of research immersion per week and a 5-page final paper. Please contact Maurice Schweitzer if you are interested in enrolling in the course: schweitzer@wharton.upenn.edu

  • OIDD691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    Negotiation is the art and science of creating good agreements. In this course we will work on both, studying economics and psychology for the science, and practicing actual negotiations for the art. Throughout we think of negotiation in general terms, relevant not only to salary negotiations and home buying, but performance evaluations, speeches, group collaborations and interpersonal relationships. We practice these kinds of negotiations in 2-, 3-, 4-, and 6-person exercises. Potential reasons to skip this particular negotiation course: 1) We have a strong attendance policy, 2) We have strong no-computers/phones policies, 3) the course is very discussion oriented, 4) We survey your work colleagues about your influence tactics, and 5) you have a short assignment due almost every class. Beginning with the second week of class, if you miss one class you lose a letter grade. If you miss two classes you fail. We have this policy because it is an experiential class, and because your attendance directly affects classmates you are paired with. For some weeks you can attend another section if necessary. Cross-listed with MGMT691 and LGST806.

  • OIDD900 - FOUNDATIONS OF DEC PROC

    The course is an introduction to research on normative, descriptive and prescriptive models of judgement and choice under uncertainty. We will be studying the underlying theory of decision processes as well as applications in individual group and organizational choice. Guest speakers will relate the concepts of decision processes and behavioral economics to applied problems in their area of expertise. As part of the course there will be a theoretical or empirical term paper on the application of decision processes to each student's particular area of interest.

  • OIDD992 - CONFLICT MGMT SEMINAR

  • STAT101 - INTRO BUSINESS STAT

    Data summaries and descriptive statistics; introduction to a statistical computer package; Probability: distributions, expectation, variance, covariance, portfolios, central limit theorem; statistical inference of univariate data; Statistical inference for bivariate data: inference for intrinsically linear simple regression models. This course will have a business focus, but is not inappropriate for students in the college.

Awards and Honors

  • Best Conference Empirical Paper, International Association for Conflict Management, 2015
  • Finalist for the Exeter Prize in Experimetnal Economics, 2012 Description

    Pope, D. & Schweitzer, M. Is Tiger Woods loss averse? Persistent bias in the face of experience, competition, and high stakes. American Economic Review

    This paper was one of five finalists for the 2012 Exeter Prize for the best paper published in the previous year in Experimental Economics, Behavioral Economics, and Decision Theory.

  • IACM, Best Conference Paper with a Student as First Author, 2010 Description

    Brooks, A. & Schweitzer, M. (2011). Can Nervous Nelly negotiate? How anxiety causes negotiators to make low first offers, exit early, and earn less profit. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 115(1), 43-54.

    This paper won the Best Conference Paper with a Student as First Author Award at the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, 2010.

  • Excellence in Teaching Award for MBA Teaching, Wharton School, 2010
  • Best Paper Award for the Conflict Management Division at the Academy of Management Conference, 2008 Description

    The paper (co-authored with Francesca Gino) is “In the Mood for Advice: The Influence of Emotions on Advice Taking.”

  • Best Empirical Paper Award in Conflict Management, AoM, 2003 Description

    Dunn, J. & Schweitzer, M. (2005). Feeling and believing: The influence of emotion on trust. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88

    This paper won the Best Empirical Paper Award in the Conflict Management Division at the Academy of Management, August 2003. A short version of this paper was published in the Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings, August 2003.

In the News

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Activity

Latest Research

Christopher To, Gavin J. Kilduff, L. Ordonez, Maurice Schweitzer (Forthcoming), Going for it on fourth down: Rivalry increases risk-taking, physiological arousal, and promotion focus.
All Research

In the News

Will Amazon Go Capture the Holy Grail of Retail?

Amazon's new cashier-less convenience store aims to answer one of retail's thorniest challenges: Understanding why shoppers do what they do, and leveraging that knowledge into increasing sales.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/02/9
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Awards and Honors

Best Conference Empirical Paper, International Association for Conflict Management 2015
All Awards